Building supervisors shoulder many crucial responsibilities that make or break the building and eventually the environment. Among those is waste management with irresponsible tenants. Even though recycling is not really new and every leasing unit in a building has a food caddy or plastic recycling bins, waste segregation is still an overlooked practice in some businesses’ waste management policies.

food caddy

food caddy

Toxic Contamination of Recyclable Garbage

One detail that’s often ignored or taken for granted by tenants is the contamination of recyclable or dry waste. Given that recycling entails maximizing any reusable trash you have, segregation is indeed vital because it preserves the waste’s reusability by means of minimizing toxic contamination. Goes without saying, office spaces should not take waste segregation for granted.

Once your recyclable trash is contaminated, it’s just as good as rejected trash—you would not wish a recyclable material to end up useless in landfills, right?

Recycling is uncomplicated, waste segregation is kind of tough

Over and over again, employees and tenants are being reminded by building managers to reduce, reuse, and recycle often, if not always. Despite the compliance of many renters, one minimal but significant aspect of effective building waste management is typically ignored or not taken seriously granted, which is waste segregation.

Sure, the basics may be effortlessly memorized by a first-grade pupil—segregate the wet and the dry in a paper bin or desk bin, and then you are practicing good segregation already. The truth is there’s a lot more to segregation than separating two sets of rubbish with different states. If you’re being neglectful with segregation, you’re asking for more wastage in recyclable trash and money.

How does dry and recyclable waste get infected?

Dry waste gets infected the moment it gets mixed with rejected trash. For instance, if you don’t have a food caddy and you’re throwing semi-wet food wrappers and recyclable materials in one garbage bin, the dry or recyclable waste will get contaminated.

Meanwhile, if you’re working with a yellow top or blue recycling office bin, infection is more probable to occur if you are unknowingly putting together plastic bags, moist waste, trash bags, and food scraps altogether in one large recycling bin.

Garden Organics. If your office or building produces a bunch of compostable garbage or garden organics, you must purchase a food caddy from bin stores if you don’t have one. You can also label your organic bin for your garden compost.

Separate bins for contaminants. Remember to keep away from throwing in paper, polyurethane bags, leftover food, and other trash together with the garden organics because they diminish the quality of the compost.

With that being said, remember to invest in separate bins for contaminants like paper or plastic, food waste, and other forms of useless rubbish, to ensure that they won’t tarnish the quality of your dry/recyclable debris and garden organics.

Discarding both unusable and recyclable junk is way pricier than recycling them. Waste segregation, on a larger scale, takes time—that’s why it must be done with slow but sure steps, such as implementing waste segregation in small office corners.